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Climate Change

Kit Overview

The ‘CLIMATE CHANGE’ kit from WILD! Science makes sense of global weather systems and the impact of human activity.
Use real apparatus to conduct scientific experiments and grow edible crops, create rainfall , save your real ice glaciers! Watch oceans rising, create winds, test for carbon dioxide and acid emissions. And much much more…

The ‘CLIMATE CHANGE’ kit works just like OUR PLANET, and even looks like it.
Use real apparatus to conduct SCIENTIFIC EXPERIMENTS that will STARTLE, THRILL and AMAZE you. Grow and EAT your own CROPS, irrigate a DESERT, create RAINFALL and see if you can save your REAL ICE GLACIERS! Watch OCEANS RISE, create and MEASURE WINDS, measure CARBON DIOXIDE and ACID emissions. Feel the GREENHOUSE EFFECT. Float ICEBERGS and monitor OCEAN CURRENTS as they melt and much more!

Think like a Proton...always positive!

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Climate Change help

Climate Change FAQ's

A Mold on seeds is usually due to a combination of very high humidity, high temperatures, still air, and spores of fungi that have come in on air currents. Try again but at step 7 on page 15 leave the small domes off. Airflow retards fungal growth. Wait until the seeds have germinated and started to put out the first leaves, then you can try the experiments from 8 to 11.

If it still happens, leave the whole lid off until the first leaves appear. After the experiments, it’s best to do ‘growing on’ in a well-lit place but out of direct sunlight. Long periods of direct sun can ‘cook’ the plants under the lid. Once the plants have leaves they are much more resistant to fungal attack.

NOTE: The high temperatures at steps 8, 9, and 10 are only for a short while. The seeds and/or plants are safe for this time.

The trick with getting two spinners to work is:
a) do it when there is no wind, cool air temperature AND bright sunshine. Oh no: maybe this means getting up early! Look at it this way – you are doing it for science,
b) make sure the towers (poles) and spinners are centrally located and not rubbing on the inside of the chimneys.
c) if you have a spinner that is a bit off-balance, it will probably still work but you might need to tap the spinner to start it spinning. No need to push – just a tiny tap on the blades will break the friction on the point inside the cap. Otherwise, try and balance the spinner with the tiniest of blobs of sticky tac.
d) if is seems reluctant to start, best not use oil as a lubricant on plastic. Try a drop of water first inside the cap and shake it out. Or a tiny dab of washing up detergent on the point of the post.
e) depending on the air temp outside and the strength of sunlight, it might take 10 minutes to get a ‘differential in air density’ between the dome and outside. So hang in there …
The trick with getting any spinners to work is:
a) do it when there is no wind, cool air temperature AND bright sunshine. Oh no: maybe this means getting up early! Look at it this way – you are doing it for science,
b) make sure the towers (poles) and spinners are centrally located and not rubbing on the inside of the chimneys.
c) if you have a spinner that is a bit off-balance, it will probably still work but you might need to tap the spinner to start it spinning. No need to push – just a tiny tap on the blades will break the friction on the point inside the cap. Otherwise, try and balance the spinner with the tiniest of blobs of sticky tac.
d) if is seems reluctant to start, best not use oil as a lubricant on plastic. Try a drop of water first inside the cap and shake it out. Or a tiny dab of washing up detergent on the point of the post.
e) depending on the air temp outside and the strength of sunlight, it might take 10 minutes to get a ‘differential in air density’ between the dome and outside. So hang in there …
The one updraft spinner in this activity has a lot of work to do! The convection currents that power it rising up from below must pull air across the whole ‘planet’ through a much smaller hole than the port over the glacier. Plus, if we had it open,  the air falling through the port above the glacier (a catabatic wind) also helps force hot air up over the land. When the glacier port is closed, that force is no longer at work. So the spinner in this activity will naturally turn more slowly, and on a hot air temp day, it might not turn at all.
The aim is to see the cold current drop straight to the bottom, crawl along the bottom and on the way as it warms up it will start to rise. As it rises it will start to mix with the middle and top layers of the water far away from the original iceberg.
We found the wider the glass the better the effect until it got too wide. About 10cm max-width. Not too deep either or the current might not hit the bottom. 10cm deep max seems to be good. Really cold water doesn’t help, really warm water messes up the effect too. Make a lot of cubes and have fun experimenting with different water temperatures and think about what your results might mean.